(Source: alphakappa13)

mondonoir:

“In February 1983 in Rochester, NY, I found a set of Compton’s Encyclopedias, (circa 1950), bound them together using thick rope, built a pyramidal structure, and hung them in my backyard. The piece is entitled, Books of Knowledge Standing Up Against the Elements that I photographed through seasonal changes and locations wherever I lived.” [more]

Doug Beube, Books of Knowledge Standing Up Against the Elements, 1989

[Altered books, burnt Enclyclopedias]

arreter:

In April of 2009 a family home in rural Vermont burned to the ground. Fifteen months later I walked through the charred foundation and found a family photo album and a box of snapshots that had melted into a dark mass. Locals told me that that after the fire, the family had moved away and what was left there had lain exposed to the snow, rain and heat of several seasons. The object I found was a palimpsest of otherworldly patterns and colors. Nearly all recognizable imagery (the very purpose of snapshots) had dissolved, leaving an intricate visual record of the elements, chaos and loss. 
Slowly, I separated each snapshot from the mass and spread them out across the table like artifacts from some future archeological dig. The paradox of intimacy and abstraction embedded in each 4x6 sheet begged to be decoded. In photography, the “latent image” refers to an image that has been recorded, but is not yet visible, still holding the potential for meaning. But how do we talk about an image that, once visible, has receded into it’s own materiality; the rippling, cracked emulsion of a color photograph? The production of chromogenic photographs is now in rapid decline, but for decades we have depended on this material to record, rewrite and memorialize our lives. Through one destructive, albeit common, event these familiar images have been transformed into bizarre microcosmic landscapes shaped by their own chaotic material logic. This disruption interrogates our collective dependency on a very unstable medium and suggests it’s unlikely, transformative power.
Klea McKenna

arreter:

In April of 2009 a family home in rural Vermont burned to the ground. Fifteen months later I walked through the charred foundation and found a family photo album and a box of snapshots that had melted into a dark mass. Locals told me that that after the fire, the family had moved away and what was left there had lain exposed to the snow, rain and heat of several seasons. The object I found was a palimpsest of otherworldly patterns and colors. Nearly all recognizable imagery (the very purpose of snapshots) had dissolved, leaving an intricate visual record of the elements, chaos and loss. 

Slowly, I separated each snapshot from the mass and spread them out across the table like artifacts from some future archeological dig. The paradox of intimacy and abstraction embedded in each 4x6 sheet begged to be decoded. In photography, the “latent image” refers to an image that has been recorded, but is not yet visible, still holding the potential for meaning. But how do we talk about an image that, once visible, has receded into it’s own materiality; the rippling, cracked emulsion of a color photograph? The production of chromogenic photographs is now in rapid decline, but for decades we have depended on this material to record, rewrite and memorialize our lives. Through one destructive, albeit common, event these familiar images have been transformed into bizarre microcosmic landscapes shaped by their own chaotic material logic. This disruption interrogates our collective dependency on a very unstable medium and suggests it’s unlikely, transformative power.

Klea McKenna

tumbleword:

Robert Pfister    Brass, steel & oil paint on marble

tumbleword:

Robert Pfister    Brass, steel & oil paint on marble

zwartmagazine:

research for Z\w\a\r\t magazine Nr. 11 to be released early 2014

zwartmagazine:

research for Z\w\a\r\t magazine Nr. 11

to be released early 2014

zwartmagazine:


b o o k   o f   n i g h t s h a r d s
PDF book of 28 pages \ 14 images \ 6,50 EUR 
-
R\A\W F\O\R\M\S # 014
http://rawformscatalogue.blogspot.nl/
PayPal kidko@xs4all.nl \ Banktransfer

zwartmagazine:

b o o k   o f   n i g h t s h a r d s

PDF book of 28 pages \ 14 images \ 6,50 EUR

-

R\A\W F\O\R\M\S # 014

http://rawformscatalogue.blogspot.nl/

PayPal kidko@xs4all.nl \ Banktransfer

featherpress:

Octopus Journal! 5” x 7” Flat back case binding with a screen printed cover and 64 pages. I will be posting this on Etsy soon!

uispeccoll:

Mini Monday!

I’ve seen a lot of almanacs floating around both in our department and on the web, so I just wanted to share one more.  This bright green and gilded little almanac is for the year 1836, and contains everything from holidays to portraits.  What’s most impressive: you can hold it on the tip of your finger!

Almanac, 1836.  Charlotte Smith Uncatalogued Minitatures

-Laura H. 

doodadsivemade:

Card backed cover, 30 pages, sewn signatures, lokta paper
I love how this came out, it has a very otherworld feel and look. The paper is freaking cool, but a little tricky to use. It’s fairly stiff, but gets weird around glue. Ink bleeds like crazy on it as well.